‘Seeing the whole child’ and ‘Seeing the child in the family’ What can these phrases mean to practitioners in ECI?

‘Seeing the whole child’ and ‘Seeing the child in the family’  What can these phrases mean to practitioners in ECI?

Who is competent to achieve these ambitions with babies and young children with disabilities and special needs?  

Peter Limbrick writes: I am offering below a brief report of an attempt I made last year in the special circumstances of visiting a family I had not met before in the Czech Republic

Read more: ‘Seeing the whole child’ and ‘Seeing the child in the family’ What can these phrases mean to practitioners in ECI?

‘It takes leaders to break down silos: Integrating services for disabled children’ (CDC paper). Further observations focusing on local agreements about good practice

‘It takes leaders to break down silos: Integrating services for disabled children’ (CDC paper). Further observations focusing on local agreements about good practice

Health, education and social care agencies in each locality must decide and describe what, in their combined view, good practice is. After that, it would be perverse not to abide by it

 

This is the fourth and last part of a series of informal observations on the Council for Disabled Children’s

Read more: ‘It takes leaders to break down silos: Integrating services for disabled children’ (CDC paper). Further observations focusing on local agreements about good practice

‘It takes leaders to break down silos: Integrating services for disabled children’ (CDC paper). Further observations focusing this time on workforce attitudes, and a bit about cake

‘It takes leaders to break down silos: Integrating services for disabled children’ (CDC paper). Further observations focusing this time on workforce attitudes, and a bit about cake

‘I have seen therapists being unwilling to share ideas with portage workers because of differences in levels of training. The portage workers characterised this as professional snobbery.’

In the September TAC Bulletin I made informal observations about a recent paper from England’s Council for Disab

Read more: ‘It takes leaders to break down silos: Integrating services for disabled children’ (CDC paper). Further observations focusing this time on workforce attitudes, and a bit about cake

‘Therapy’ – do we really need this word in early child and family support? A question for discussion

I have not seen a universally agreed definition of ‘therapy’ in early child and family support

Peter Limbrick writes:

If we are imagining a sunnier future post C-19 for families whose child has various developmental difficulties, then I would like to play with the idea of dispensing with the word ‘t

Read more: ‘Therapy’ – do we really need this word in early child and family support? A question for discussion

For First Nations people the bushfires bring a particular grief, burning what makes us who we are

Extract from an aricle in the Guardian on 5/1/2020 by Lorena Allam:  

There’s a midden at Murramarang on the south coast that dates back to the ice age. It holds the stories of 12,000 years of Yuin occupation in layers of stone tools and spearpoints, fish bones and oyster shells.

To get there y

Read more: For First Nations people the bushfires bring a particular grief, burning what makes us who we are

‘It takes leaders to break down silos: Integrating services for disabled children’ (CDC paper). Further observations focusing this time on what families can do to help integrate local services

‘It takes leaders to break down silos: Integrating services for disabled children’ (CDC paper). Further observations focusing this time on what families can do to help integrate local services

‘If fragmentation has been highlighted...as a problem for children and families, there is nothing to prevent parents setting up a meeting...and inviting service managers to it.’

This is the third part of a series of informal observations on the Council for Disabled Children’s paper, ‘It takes leader

Read more: ‘It takes leaders to break down silos: Integrating services for disabled children’ (CDC paper). Further observations focusing this time on what families can do to help integrate local services

‘It takes leaders to break down silos’ – report by Council for Disabled Children offers more of the same. Disappointing

‘It takes leaders to break down silos’ – report by Council for Disabled Children offers more of the same. Disappointing

“The report intended to identify key factors enabling or hindering progress towards service integration but...has fallen short by omitting training, rights and discrimination and by underestimating user power.”

 

Informal observations on the UK Council for Disabled Children’s report: It takes l

Read more: ‘It takes leaders to break down silos’ – report by Council for Disabled Children offers more of the same. Disappointing

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